Chicken Buses of Guatemala

When American school buses reach the age of ten years or 150,000 miles, they are sold at auction. Many of these buses are bought and driven down through Mexico to Guatemala and other Central American countries where they are prepared for their second lives. Instead of carting children to school, the buses spend their second life transporting people often filled to the brim with goods and driving at high speeds over mountain passes. The word "chicken" refers to the fact that rural Guatemalans occasionally transport live animals such as chicken - a practice that visitors from other countries often find remarkable. The word might also refer to the tight manner in which passengers are crammed into these retired U.S. school buses. Either way, the experience is something travellers never forget.

Each bus has one or two young men called ayudante or helper. The ayudante is responsible for passengers and luggage, collecting money, and organizing the suitcases, livestock, or produce, etc. onto the roof of the bus - often while in motion. Loudly announcing destinations the bus is reaching is also a responsibility.


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